It’s potty time

K has had an obsession with being a “nay bee” (naked baby) lately, and who can blame him? I mean, I’d love to be naked all day too. Especially when it’s 80 degrees and you have no AC and you live somewhere that is practically touching the sun.

Naked baby time also means optimal time for potty learning. Let’s face it, he’s going to pee on the floor, might as well keep the potty near by.

Wait- let me back up a bit. Last week I night weaned him. I used Dr Jay Gordon’s method, but basically since I already knew he can fall asleep without nursing I skipped ahead to just comforting him when he woke. The first night was hell, the second night was better and the third night went like this:

K: muk
Me: no. Sleep.
K: hug.

So I gave him a hug and he’d go back to bed. He decided that if he didn’t get milk he no longer wanted to sleep with me, which broke my heart, but I can tell that he’s a lot less restless in his own bed so it’s for the best.

Anyways, skipping forward. All of a sudden he’s still waking at night, despite no having milk, wanting to use the potty. Okay… At least it’s something. I’ll take it. So now he’s waking three times a night wanting to pee or with a wet diaper, and I know we’re not ready to cut out liquids the hour before bed, so ah well. This too shall pass. What’s another year of not sleeping.

His piece de resistance for avoiding bedtime has been that he needs to go potty for months now, so I usually just take it as his way of fighting sleep. Well, I moved the potty seat into his room, and while he can read a book I won’t read one to him. So now, he’s actually peeing on it before bed consistently.

So this all brings us to today. I let him nap naked (with a puppy pad under his sheets, I’m not crazy) since he’s usually dry after his naps. He wakes up.

Me: let’s go use the potty.

K: no.

Me: you don’t think you have to go yet?

K: on da floor. (Points in front of him on the ground.)

Me: no no pee belongs in the potty. Let’s go.

I go to bring him to the bathroom but before I get to where he’s sitting.

"Peepees on da floor!"

And he starts peeing.

Mmmkay.

I know you’re supposed to say things like “that’s alright, you’ll get it in the potty next time,” but somehow that feels inappropriate in this situation.

I love getting up at 6am.
I love getting up at 6am.
I love getting up at 6am.

ollietherottweiler:


africandogontheprairie:

Your choice affects your dog’s choice — a lesson I’m reminded of everyday. (Image credit goes to Lili Chin.)
Way back this winter, when Chalo started having growly reactions toward other dogs, I made the mistake of correcting him for it. Traditional wisdom and all the training books I’d read as a kid in the ’90s told me firm discipline was necessary, so I spoke sternly and used physical corrections with a choke collar. Surprise: in just 48 hours, it became so much worse. A little growliness turned into full-on explosions of snarling and lunging and raised hackles and high emotions. The changes were happening so quickly it frightened me. This was not a dog I recognized. So I backtracked, devoured every bit of reactivity literature I could find on the internet, and soon wondered if, in Chalo’s mind, the situation looked very different. To him, it seemed to be, “Every time we see a dog, my person gets worried and bad things happen. She becomes a person I do not recognize. I need to growl more to make that dog go away, and to keep bad things from happening.” My whole perspective on the issue changed — or at least, made me more receptive to alternatives, out of desperation and concern that I was singlehandedly ruining my dog.
The next day I approached it differently, with a soft, open, patient mindset and a bag full of cheese. And in one session, Chalo was sitting quietly and sweetly, twenty feet away from the golden retriever who previously sent him into a growling frenzy.
In one week, he was walking past yards of snarling, lunging, barking, frustrated dogs with the same sweet, quiet, expectant look on his face.
Today, Chalo hasn’t growled at another dog in months.
I definitely don’t propose that there is any one-size-fits-all training method for every dog, and everything I don’t know about dogs could fill several rooms several times over. But Chalo teaches me so much, all the time: how to be a better teacher, how to approach problems creatively, how to be patient, how to motivate. So many canine behavior problems are misunderstandings, rooted partly in a failure of human imagination and empathy. And that is fixable. That can change. Chalo continues to show me what I need to give more of, not just in dog training but in life in general — reflection on my own actions, and consideration for how we all can be shaped, battered, or buoyed by the world around us. Dogs can make us better, and this dog is making me better. 

important


This is soooooooooooo important.

ollietherottweiler:

africandogontheprairie:

Your choice affects your dog’s choice — a lesson I’m reminded of everyday. (Image credit goes to Lili Chin.)

Way back this winter, when Chalo started having growly reactions toward other dogs, I made the mistake of correcting him for it. Traditional wisdom and all the training books I’d read as a kid in the ’90s told me firm discipline was necessary, so I spoke sternly and used physical corrections with a choke collar. Surprise: in just 48 hours, it became so much worse. A little growliness turned into full-on explosions of snarling and lunging and raised hackles and high emotions. The changes were happening so quickly it frightened me. This was not a dog I recognized. So I backtracked, devoured every bit of reactivity literature I could find on the internet, and soon wondered if, in Chalo’s mind, the situation looked very different. To him, it seemed to be, “Every time we see a dog, my person gets worried and bad things happen. She becomes a person I do not recognize. I need to growl more to make that dog go away, and to keep bad things from happening.” My whole perspective on the issue changed — or at least, made me more receptive to alternatives, out of desperation and concern that I was singlehandedly ruining my dog.

The next day I approached it differently, with a soft, open, patient mindset and a bag full of cheese. And in one session, Chalo was sitting quietly and sweetly, twenty feet away from the golden retriever who previously sent him into a growling frenzy.

In one week, he was walking past yards of snarling, lunging, barking, frustrated dogs with the same sweet, quiet, expectant look on his face.

Today, Chalo hasn’t growled at another dog in months.

I definitely don’t propose that there is any one-size-fits-all training method for every dog, and everything I don’t know about dogs could fill several rooms several times over. But Chalo teaches me so much, all the time: how to be a better teacher, how to approach problems creatively, how to be patient, how to motivate. So many canine behavior problems are misunderstandings, rooted partly in a failure of human imagination and empathy. And that is fixable. That can change. Chalo continues to show me what I need to give more of, not just in dog training but in life in general — reflection on my own actions, and consideration for how we all can be shaped, battered, or buoyed by the world around us. Dogs can make us better, and this dog is making me better. 

important

This is soooooooooooo important.

reasonsmysoniscrying:

Ahahaha…. If you need me, I guess I’ll be in grocery store jail.

Amen. The old ladies give death looks when I let K “surf.”

reasonsmysoniscrying:

Ahahaha…. If you need me, I guess I’ll be in grocery store jail.

Amen. The old ladies give death looks when I let K “surf.”

Guess how much I love you

K’s favorite book right now is Guess How Much I Love you. He calls it the “hop book.” Everytime I tell him I love him, he reaches his hands up and I have to say, “I love you as high as I can reach!” Then he goes, “hop.” and I say, “I love you as high as I can hop.” And then he says, “moon!” and points up and I say “I love you right up to the moon and back.” Then he gets this satisfied look on his face and it makes my heart melt.

Typical day with K

Yesterday I drove K across town for shoes. He found these gray See Kai Run shoes with a yellow K on them, and was obviously obsessed with them. I was thinking they could possibly be the ticket to getting him to give up wearing his yellow fireman rain boots everywhere (I mean, I know we live in Canada, but it still gets hot in the summer!)

They didn’t have his size though, so we drove thirty minutes on the chance that another store would have them. Lucky us, they did! I go to try them on his feet to make sure he hadn’t grown overnight again, and he’s putting on a pair of black shoes.

"Back shews."

"I thought you wanted yellow shoes! Look!"

"Back shews."

Ugh. Okay kid. I try them on his feet and squeals with delight. “Back shhhhews!” He then runs away from me going “Home!”

Whoever said boys were fun because they let you dress them till college was a liar.

thedaddycomplex:

mammalingo:

I have 17 charts (most of them are new) featured today in the Huffington Post if you’d like to see them. If you do not want to see them, whatever you do, do not click on this link. 

Do this now and you’ll get an extra hour in the ball pit.

Accurate. Every time I tell my toddler to “use his words” a la Daniel Tiger, I’m pretty sure a puppy dies.

thedaddycomplex:

mammalingo:

I have 17 charts (most of them are new) featured today in the Huffington Post if you’d like to see them. If you do not want to see them, whatever you do, do not click on this link. 

Do this now and you’ll get an extra hour in the ball pit.

Accurate. Every time I tell my toddler to “use his words” a la Daniel Tiger, I’m pretty sure a puppy dies.

I cannot wait until K speaks in full sentences, if only so that he can tell me what the eff is yellow, black and purple and why he chants it like a mantra at bedtime.

Day at the zoo

Today we had an amazing trip to the zoo. I was afraid that it would be packed because of the holiday tomorrow, but I guess everyone is camping or cottaging. Kaleb just loved being outside, he was trying to climb under every tree and had to smell every flower while telling me the colors.

We went to the urban farm petting zoo. He was so sweet. I reminding him that he had to be gentle, quiet and couldn’t run. So he very sweetly walked up to a sheep and say down beside him like “hey dude, let’s chill.” So funny! At one point they all started baa-ing. He wasn’t a fan of that part.

He really enjoyed looking at the arctic fox. And I got him a kiddie cone (he ate the whole thing!) it was adorable watching him eat it. He’s usually so good at sharing, not with his ice cream comes apparently. I can’t believe he doesn’t have a stomach ache. But once in a while, you just have to let your toddler gorge themselves on ice cream.

He was pointing out the letters everywhere, so I was telling them what they spelt. Well, zoo is everywhere of course. So by the end of the day he was squealing “Zoo!” Every time he saw the word! I feel like he’s going to be reading by 3! Crazy kid.

19 months

K is 19 months and blowing my mind everyday. Get ready for some bragging.

He knows his ABCs and has become completely aware of text in books. I’ve started reading him more difficult books like the “5 minute tales” types because if I read a board book he will follow along. Instead of relaxing, he tries to read it! He’s also started memorizing his books. He can spell his name, which is adorable.

He is becoming a number whiz kid. I know for sure that he can count to 30, but it could be higher because one day I counted to 40, and he continued to 49. I don’t know if he knows 40, 50, 60 yet on his own though. Also, the other day he pointed out a 35, and he’s starting to show interest in clocks and time. He can also count backwards from 10, and loves to scramble up his puzzle pieces, throw away the board, and sequence the numbers forward and backward.

Shapes. He understands rectangle, circle, triangle, square, pentagon, star and heart. I haven’t really exposed him to any others yet, those are just the standard shapes we have around.

Colors: yellow is his favorite right now. He also knows green, blue, purple, orange, red, pink, black, brown and white. I’ve started teaching him turquoise too only because he seems to be getting confused when he sees blue-green.

He knows quite a few animal sounds and thinks “bee bo bee boo boo” (a robot) is hilarious. He has also started to pretend to be a cat, crawling around on all fours and meowing. It’s hilariously adorable!!

He knows a lot of body parts. Head shoulders, neck, belly, legs, arms, hands, fingers, wrist, knees, feet, toes, heels, eyes, ears, mouth, nose, cheeks, chin. Possibly more, but I know those ones he knows without a doubt.

He can write 1s and 2s. He also has a game on the iPad where you trace the numbers with your finger, on that he’s able to trace 1-10.

He loves to pick out his own clothes and has started to try to dress himself. He loves wearing his boots because he’s able to get them on and off by himself. He will also wipe his nose (sometimes without me even prompting him!) with a Kleenex.

He’s very helpful around the house. If he wants me to play with him but I have to say, put something I the refrigerator first, he will run over and open it for me :)

He can work the DVD player, which makes everyone but me nervous lol

He loves to paint, color and play with play dough.

He loves music. He can go through the iphone or iPad and no word of a lie, find the song he wants to listen to. He has also started to sing along to some of his favorite songs (with actual words now!). His favorites are: This is How we Roll, Party People, That’s my Kinda Night, Springsteen, Love is an Open Door and the Cars soundtrack.

His favorite book right now is What Does the Fox Say. He’s also been loving Guess How Much I Love you.

He can put his Thomas train together, although he doesn’t make it a circle (who says it has to be anyway?)

He loves to number and count things. Outside he has numbered my stairs with chalk, and inside he will put his puzzle and clock pieces all over to count things, which leads to them getting lost, which leads to him running around crying “free free” because he sang find the number three. And them he squeals with such delight when you find it.

He loves loves loves Cars. Lightning McQueen makes him shy. He has starting talking along with the movie, line for line. Which is impressive because he doesn’t have many words at all. (Well, I mean I’m sure he has a pretty good amount for 19 months lol but he’s not talking in sentences or anything).

He’s starting to put two words together. Hi and bye kitty and puppy. Blue A, yellow star, things like that.

He has a total personality. Everything is no. He loves to be silly. He gives the best hugs and kisses to everything. He signs I love you. He says peese mama in the cutest way possible. He’s just amazing.